Gerrymandering

                     The definition of gerrymandering from Wikipedia is as follows; in the process of setting electoral districts, gerrymandering, is a practice that attempsts to establish a political advantahe for a particular party or group by manipulating district boundaries to create partisan advantaged districts. The resulting district is known as a gerrymander, however the world can also refer to the practice. In addition to its use achieving desired election results for a particular party, gerrymandering may be used to help or hinder a particular DEMOGRAPHIC.

                   Although gerrymandering is illegal, it is used by the party in power to maintain power. It helps them keep control of state governments and the House of Representatives. Obviously it doesnt work as well in Presidential elections, or else Mitt Romney would be president not President Obama.

                Gerrymandering hsd been challenged many times in federal court and has been legislated against. In 1842, the Reapportionment Act required that congressional districts be continous and compact. In 1862, the Supreme Court ruled that districts must follow the principle of ” one man, one vote” and have fair borders and an appropriate population mixture. Most recently, the Supreme Court ruled in 1985 that manipulating district borders to give an advantage to one political party was unconstitutional.

                 There are 3 methods to gerrymandering. Excess vote concentrates the voting powers of opposition into just a few districts. Effectively diluting the opposition power outside those districts. Wasted vote dilutes the opposition voting power across many districts. Preventing opposition majority in as many districts as possible. Stacked method draws bizarre boundaries to concentrate the power of the majority party by linking distant areas into specific party in power districts.

                  The 113th Congress has 232 Republicans and 200 Democrats with 3 vacancies. Despite Republicans getting defeated badly in the popular vote they still have an over 52% majority in tge House. Republicans are guilty of gerrymandering many states before the 2012 election. Obama won Pa. by more than 5 points, but Democrats only carried 5 of the states 18 congressional seats. Obama won Virginia, but Dems only carried 3 of 11 seats. Obama won Ohio but Dems only carried 4 of 16 seats. Those are just a few examples.

                  You would think winning the popular vote would put that party in power. Now we have 2 recent exampled that its not true. Bush beating Gore in 2000 election, and the 2012 election. This is just another Republican strategy to take the vote away from the people. It is happening as we speak, look at tge changing voting districts in Pennsylvania. They say cheaters never win, but the facts dispute that.

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